Status Update - May 8, 2020 In response to the guidance provided by our local, state, and federal authorities and many national medical associations, we will carefully open our clinical practices and surgical centers. We want to do our part to help manage the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Should your eye care needs require our emergency attention please go to our location page for more information and availability. We have added additional measures to ensure the health and safety of our patients and staff CLICK HERE to find out more. We are requiring all patients to wear face masks or covering during visits. Stay tuned for the latest information on our status and additional guidance on our response to this health crisis.

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Coronavirus and Your Eyes

What is coronavirus?

There are many types of viruses called coronaviruses, and some of them can make you sick. The new type we are hearing about now as part of this pandemic is called COVID-19. This virus causes mild to severe lung illness.

People who are exposed to coronavirus may show symptoms anywhere from two to 14 days after exposure. Those symptoms can include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Some people can develop pneumonia and become seriously ill or die from coronavirus complications.

How can coronavirus affect your eyes?

The first thing to understand is that coronavirus can spread through the eyes — just as it does through the mouth or nose.

When someone who has coronavirus coughs, sneezes, or talks, virus particles can spray from their mouth or nose onto your face. You are likely to breathe these tiny droplets in through your mouth or nose. But the droplets can also enter your body through your eyes. You can also become infected by touching your eyes after touching something that has the virus on it.

It might be possible for coronavirus to cause a pink eye infection (conjunctivitis), but this is extremely rare. If you have pink eye, don’t panic. Simply call your ophthalmologist to let them know and follow their instructions for care. Keep in mind that whether pink eye is caused by a virus or bacteria, it can spread if someone touches that sticky or runny discharge from the eyes, or touches objects contaminated by the discharge.

Protecting your eye and health – quick tips!

  • If you wear contact lenses, try switching to glasses for a while.
  • Wearing glasses may add a layer of protection.
  • Stock up on eye medicine prescriptions if you can.
  • Avoid rubbing your eyes.
  • Use common sense to stay healthy.
  • Wash your hands a lot. Follow good contact lens hygiene. And avoid touching or rubbing your nose, mouth and eyes.

We'll SEE this through together!

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